Poutine: Canadian #AtoZChallenge

WPhat!?!?  What is this crazy word you speak of?

Poutine is definitely a Canadian food.  I know what you’re thinking.  There’s no such thing as Canadian food.  Even U.S. National Security Advisor Stu Smiley (played by Kevin Pollock) in the movie Canadian Bacon said “First of all, there is no Canadian culture. I’ve never read any Canadian literature. And when have you ever heard anyone say, “Honey, lets stay in and order Canadian food”?”

Poutine is so Canadian, I’ve seen attempts at recreating it here in the U.S. and they have all failed.

Poutine is a French Canadian dish consisting of french fries, cheese curds (squeaky cheese) and gravy. Few dispute the fact that poutine came from Quebec, however many communities in Quebec believe that theirs is the birthplace of the dish.

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Source: Papa Mario’s, Halifax NS

Here in the states, I’ve seen poutine made with shredded mozzarella, and every Canadian I know would tell you that is simply blasphemous.  It has to be curds.  And it has to be brown gravy.

Personally, the best poutine can be found in Kingston, Ontario at a place called Bubba’s Poutine and Pizzeria. Kingston is a college town, with St. Lawrence College, Queen’s University and the Royal Military College giving the downtown core constant attendance. Day and night.  Bubba’s is known as a late night drunk snack stop.  People travel past Bubba’s on their way home from the Ontario Street clubs.  And they pick up what – at three o’clock in the morning – seems like the most amazing food in the world!

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Here’s a recipe if you want to make it yourself:  http://allrecipes.com/recipe/79300/real-poutine/.

In Newfoundland, there is another dish that is equally as delicious, but has its own twist:  Fries, dressing and gravy.  Instead of cheese curds, they use savoury turkey stuffing!  So delicious!

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Source: Stuffed at the Gill’s Food Blog: http://stuffedatthegills.blogspot.com

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Ketchup Chips: Canadian #AtoZChallenge

KYes!  Of course!  How could I not??

Ketchup Chips, although available sporadically through the U.S. as a less flavourful version made by Herr’s, are known as a quintessential Canadian snack. You would think, since Americans put ketchup on EVERYTHING, that Ketchup Chips would be a thing down here in the states.  But for some unexplained reason, Ketchup Chips are not only scarce here, Americans seem to detest them! Buzzfeed asked some of their American staff to taste Canadian snacks, and it seems that Ketchup Chips “taste like a mistake”.

A glorious, dreamy, delicious mistake!

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I will throw out clothes so I can fit bags of Ketchup Chips in my luggage when I’m travelling back home. I will pay $30 for a taxi to take me to where I can get Ketchup Chips. Of all the things that I miss about Canada – Ketchup Chips ranks up there right after my family and friends!

But the trick is this.  Forget those Lay’s Ketchup Chips.  There are only two kinds even worth buying.  The first is the classic Old Dutch Ketchup Chip (not the baked kind – the real chips) and then the President’s Choice Loads of Ketchup Rippled Potato Chips.

These:

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There is so much ketchup flavouring on these chips, it’s almost questionable whether you even need the potato. #sogood.

I still wonder why the stark difference between Canadian and American tastes when it comes to potato chips? We are a lot alike on a lot of things.  So why not Ketchup Chips?

Maybe Canadians actually don’t really know they hate Ketchup Chips because they are so set on loving something Americans don’t.

I asked my Facebook friends what they thought:

American Friend: “Because your tastebuds have frozen off your tongue?”

Canadian Friend: “We’re being patriotic: they’re red like our flag.”

Canadian Friend: “Canadians prefer salty, while Americans prefer sweet.”

American Friend: “Ketchup Chipes are reason number 5751 to be suspicious of Canadians.”

Canadian Friend: “Ew, I don’t like Ketchup Chips. Maybe I’m secretly American.”

So…. what do you think?  Have you tried Ketchup Chips? Would you?  If you’ve tried them, yay or nay? Why do you think there’s such a difference in preference between our two countries?

 

 

Donair: Canadian #AtoZChallenge

DYou’re probably wondering what crazy Canadian thing could a “Donair” be? An animal? A Canadian term for a kite?

Well, picture this:  a gyro or a Turkish Döner kebab but wayyyyy more awesomer!!!!

Donairs came to be in Halifax, Nova Scotia back in the early 1970’s, and have since become a nationwide premier choice for late night, drunk delicacies!  Donairs started off made with beef on a vertical rotisserie, and were then wrapped with diced onion and tomato in a flatbread.

But that’s not all!  There’s no tzatziki sauce on these addictive treats!  Donairs come with a special sweet white sauce.

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Source: The National Post

Donairs now have expanded across Canada, but they are truly still an east coast delicacy.  Halifax’s King of Donair claims to be the first restaurant to sell Donairs and is usually the first place Canadians go if they’re visiting the coastal city.

Donairs are so engrained in east coast life, that Halifax city councillor put forward a notion last October to make the Donair the official food of Halifax!

So, if you’re not in eastern Canada, or have never tried a Donair, here’s a recipe on Allrecipes.com that may give you the experience without visiting! I make sure I have one every time I’m back home!

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