Flag: Canadian #AtoZChallenge

Let’s talk Fabout the Canadian Flag, eh? What a unique design – and it’s perfectly symmetrical – looks the same no matter which way it’s flying!

I’d like to think it’s widely recognized around the world.  So much, in fact that people from (ahem) other countries sew Canadian Flags to their backpacks so people think they’re Canadian!

So can anyone guess how long Canada has had the flag you see today?

The 50-star version of the Star Spangled Banner is 56 years old. The Maple Leaf we use today was adopted 51 years ago.  Before that, well, let’s just say that Canadians aren’t always as agreeable as some might think.

Before 1965, our flag looked like this:

Canadian_Red_Ensign_(1957-1965).svg

It was called the Canadian Red Ensign, and it paid homage to our British roots in the top left corner (where we came from) and the Canadian Coat of Arms in the centre-right (who we became).

Many Canadians wanted a flag that depicted our own identity as a free country, away from our colonial roots, but many others wanted an original flag that still contained the Union Jack. And over the years, Canadians debated what that depiction might look like.  In 1964, Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson presented the plan to change the flag and Canadians argued for over six months on what the final product would look like, causing much tension and conflict within parliament during the process. In fact, according to reports, it got downright nasty between people at Parliament Hill for a while.

To see some of the proposed flags and the controversy, check out this video:


Eventually, today’s design of the Maple Leaf was approved. It contained red and white (already the official colours of Canada, by King’s decree), and a centred maple leaf (a symbol used to represent Canada since the 1700’s). Finally, in 1964, the Canadian government voted to adopt the Maple Leaf as the new national flag.

Ta da! (in case you didn’t know what it looked like):

Flag_of_Canada.svg-1

So I’ll conclude with some interesting national flag facts:

  • The majority of flag suggestions depicted a maple leaf, followed by a union jack, and followed by a beaver.  We could have had a rodent on our flag!
  • February 15th is “National Flag Day” in Canada, the day of the official inauguration ceremony in 1965.
  • People might still see the original Red Ensign around Canada – mostly at Veterans organizations and legions.  Most of the people who rejected the Maple Leaf were veterans, who had fought for Canada under a much different flag.
  • There is no official law saying how you should treat or fly the Canadian Flag, but the Department of Canadian Heritage have published some rules and guidelines that people should follow.
  • The Canadian flag is twice as long as it is wide.
  • It is not illegal to burn the Canadian Flag as it would violate citizens’ freedom of expression under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. In fact, it is suggested that the dignified way to destroy a worn or tattered flag is to burn it privately.

Canadians are very proud of their flag. They will wave it at the top of mountains. wear it on their shirts, or wrap a Canadian Flag towel around them on the ski hills (no names)! If you see someone with a Canadian Flag, say “Hello Canada!”  Apparently, the world thinks we’re pretty friendly people (for the most part)!

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D = Dubrovnik

DAs part of the A to Z Blogging Challenge, once we post our blog entry for the day, we are supposed to go through this list, visit other blogs and comment.  I’ve been checking out the next four blogs after mine,and one (TR) or Travel blog each day! The other day I found this great blog entry written by Jeremy about traveling alone. Travel can be a completely different experience whether you’re in groups, as a couple or on your own.  I quite enjoy “lonesome traveling”.  It prevents distractions and allows me to see things more clearly and better immerse myself in the local culture.

One place I visited alone was Dubrovnik, Croatia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Dubrovnik is a fascinating walled city on the Mediterranean. Despite its protected status, the Yugoslav People’s Army didn’t seem to care and besieged the city for seven months in 1991 and 1992, destroying more than half of the city’s infrastructure. It didn’t take long following the most recent Balkan’s conflict to begin rebuilding efforts in the original style and originally used material.

Back to traveling alone:  I spent four days in Dubrovnik, simply walking around the city, taking in the sights and sounds, and concentrating on the remnants of a not-forgotten war. It was amazing how much was reconstituted in only eight years and how quickly the city gave the appearance of returning to a normal life.

** Neat Fact: Most recently, Dubrovnik has been used as various sets for the television show The Game of Thrones, depicting the city of King’s Landing.

Enjoy my pictures.  Taken in 2000, before I could afford a digital camera!

dub 1

Walled city with Lokrum in the background

Walled city with Lokrum in the background

Narrow streets and stairways

Narrow streets and stairways

Dubrovnik from above

Dubrovnik from above

Dubrovnik from above.  Looks like they had cable cars prior to the war - see bottom right corner of photo.

Dubrovnik from above. Looks like they had cable cars prior to the war – see bottom right corner of photo.

B = Bullets

BNot just any bullets, which I’ve noticed you can find just about anywhere across the United States (this Canadian is still in awe at the relative ease of accessibility of weapons and ammo here).  These are special bullets.  They tell a story. One that happened before most of us were born.

In mid to late August, 1944, Canadian Major David Currie’s armoured battlegroup near St. Lambert-sur-Dives, France managed to repel attacking German forces with a final tally of approximately 2,000 German casualties.

In one tightly controlled corridor,the majority of the action resulted in a ton of casualties and incapacitated military equipment and vehicles. So much, in fact, that when I did a France Battlefield tour in 2007 (63 years later), we didn’t have to dig very deep to find artifacts from that very battle. The interesting thing about the bullets I found was that two were rather heavy, while another was significantly lighter.  Our guide explained that due to the numerous explosions, one of the bullets was so hot that the lead leaked out of the casing.

What is the story behind these bullets?  Are they strays that were simply fired downrange? Did they hit someone, or something?  We will never know, but they hold a small piece of history in them that will remain forever encapsulated in these artifacts.

It is incredible to think of the remnants of war that stay for decades and generations after peace has been achieved.

WWII Bullets from Falaise Pocket

WWII Bullets from Falaise Pocket

The story: there was an armoury explosion and this rifle got stuck in a tree and grew with it for 60+ years.

The story: there was an armoury explosion and this rifle got stuck in a tree and grew with it for 60+ years.

Digging for artifacts in Falaise Pocket

Digging for artifacts in Falaise Pocket

My collection of sand and rocks from various beaches

My collection of sand and rocks from various beaches

My collection of sand and rocks from various beaches

My collection of sand and rocks from various beaches